Trying to make sense of CNG terminology? Here’s a CNG glossary to help you.

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog/News

Trying to make sense of CNG terminology? Here’s a CNG glossary to help you.

Many of our callers are confused with the common CNG terminology. Please refer to this page as guide for your CNG glossary to better understand what those abbreviations stand for. Btu (British Thermal Unit) Btu corresponds to the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of one pound mass of water by 1° F DGE (Diesel Gallon Equivalent) DGE corresponds to the amount of CNG containing the same energy content as one gallon of diesel. Ultra-low sulfur diesel has slightly less energy than traditional diesel, so 1.35 therms per DGE is commonly cited conversion rate. GGE (Gasoline Gallon Equivalent) GGE corresponds to the amount of CNG containing the same energy content as one gallon of gasoline. The typical conversion rate is 1.25 therms per GGE. Inlet or Suction Pressure Both inlet and suction pressure refer to the incoming pipeline gas pressure that supplies the CNG station. Inlet pressure is one of the main factors that determines the overall flow rate of a CNG station. LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) LNG is natural gas that has been cooled to -259 degrees Fahrenheit (-161 degrees Celsius) and then condensed into a colorless, odorless, non-corrosive and non-toxic liquid. LNG is characterized as a cryogenic liquid. Methane Methane (CH4), commonly known as natural gas, is an abundant, colorless gas that burns efficiently without many byproducts. As methane is naturally odorless, it has a distinctive odor added as a safety measure. MMBtu One Million Btu. PSI (Pounds per Square Inch) PSI refers to pressure measured with respect to atmosphere pressure. Pressure gauges are adjusted to read zero at the surrounding atmospheric pressure. SCF (Standard Cubic Foot) Contains approximately 1,000 BTU. SCFM (Standard Cubic Feet per Minute) SCFM is the standard measurement for the flow rate of gas. A CNG station with a flow rate of 125 SCFM equates to 1 GGE per minute. Therm 100,000 British thermal units (BTU). A common measure of gas as sold by utilities. Attached is a unit conversions fact sheet for most of the units used in Energy...

Read More »

Nanobox – Natural gas fueling station in PA

Posted by on Aug 10, 2013 in CNG Equipment, pictures of cng station

Could Natural Gas powered cars and trucks be the next big thing? Some state lawmakers and local businesses think so. Representative Stan Saylor (R) 94th District held a press conference Tuesday to promote natural gas as a vehicle fuel. “We have been talking for 40 years about getting off of the foreign dependence of oil. Nobody, no politician, has done anything about it,” said Saylor. “For the first time we really truly have the opportunity to get off the dependence of foreign oil, and do something about it. And use an American resource that we have readily available to us.” At the press conference organizers unveiled a fueling station that we could see in the near future. Shipley Energy plans to convert some of the businesses fleet to natural gas within the next year. “We’ll have a fueling facility to be constructed in the early part of 2014 to fuel those trucks and others in York. It’ll be open to the public, and we’re out talking right now to other businesses and fleets to see where other opportunities are to convert,” said Matt Sommer with Shipley Energy. “It seems like a tremendous opportunity with all of this gas that is available in the state of Pennsylvania. The savings are pretty tremendous particularly when you look at high mileage vehicles you can save a lot of money versus diesel or gasoline.” “You see a price sign and you see gasoline at say $3.50 a gallon and right underneath it CNG for $1.99 a gallon. Once people are driving around and fueling their vehicle and seeing that day in and day out, we think there will be more of a ground swell and interest in conversions,” said Sommer. Natural gas vehicles: [Alternative Fuels Data Center] Natural gas powers about 112,000 vehicles in the United States and roughly 14.8 million vehicles worldwide. Natural gas vehicles (NGVs), which can run on compressed natural gas (CNG), are good choices for high-mileage, centrally fueled fleets that operate within a limited area. For vehicles needing to travel long distances, liquified natural gas (LNG) is a good choice. The advantages of natural gas as a transportation fuel include its domestic availability, widespread distribution infrastructure, low-cost, and clean-burning qualities. CNG and LNG are considered alternative fuels under the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The horsepower, acceleration, and cruise speed of NGVs are comparable with those of equivalent conventional vehicles. And, compared with conventional diesel and gasoline vehicles, NGVs can produce some emissions benefits. There are many heavy-duty natural gas vehicles—as well as few light-duty NGVs—available from original equipment manufacturers. Qualified system retrofitters can also economically, safely, and reliably convert many vehicles for natural gas operation. There are three types of NGVs: Dedicated: These vehicles are designed to run only on natural gas. Bi-fuel: These vehicles have two separate fueling systems that enable them to run on either natural...

Read More »

CNG vs Diesel and ROI Calculator

Posted by on Aug 9, 2013 in Blog/News

CNG vs Diesel and ROI Calculator

Natural gas vehicles help fleets go green and add green to the bottom line. While the cost of diesel continues to rise, the cost of natural gas remains steady and significantly cheaper. Use this CNG vs Diesel calculator below to find out how much money you can save by choosing Natural Gas fuel for your vehicles. CNG vs Diesel 1. CNG prices are typically listed in gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE). For comparison purposes, all CNG prices and cost calculations include a conversion into diesel gallon equivalent (DGE). DISCLAIMER: Calculated savings based on testing performed by DTNA and customer input. Calculation includes numerous assumptions please click assumptions button in a player. Actual savings may vary and will depend on a variety of factors including load equipment type, driver performance, distances traveled, road conditions, vehicle speed, idle time, PTO time, etc. CNG ROI Calculator This payback depends on the efficiency of the vehicles and the mileage a company puts on its regular gasoline fuel truck fleet. The lower the efficiency and the higher the mileage, there will be a quicker return on...

Read More »

Used CNG fueling station and 60 used Steel CNG Storage Cylinders

Posted by on Jul 28, 2013 in Used CNG Equipment

The city of Kirkland is accepting sealed bids for the sale of a used Compressed Natural Gas – CNG fueling station which includes a Compressor Pump and 60 used Steel CNG Storage Cylinders. The used DFSInc N20-G Ingersoll-Rand electric belt drive compressor is 3ph 208/240 volt 20 hp AC driven. This compressor of this Used CNG fueling station was designed for Class 1, Div. 1, Group D environments. It is a four stage unit designed for 5 P.S.I.G inlet pressure and temp compensated discharge to 3600 P.S.I.G. output and service when used with Mobil DTE lubrication. This compressor was placed in service in 1982 and has not been in service since 2003. The City of Kirkland is not aware of the condition of the compressor of this Used CNG fueling station and provides no provision of its suitability for service or operating condition. The used (60 each), DFSInc branded 51″ X 9 1/4″, DOT 3AA3600 carbon steel HP cylinders were manufactured prior to January 1978 and are currently expired in the DOT required certification. The last certification known was December 1996. The City of Kirkland assumes no liability as to the ability to certify their suitability for use. Cylinders are currently non – compliant and can not be used. The cylinders are contained in 20 cylinder groups in 3 ea. wire containment baskets and are manifolded together with DOT steel brake service tubing. All buyers should be aware that the cylinders may contain an unknown quantity of Mobil DTE grade air compressor oil along with an unknown volume of natural gas at pressures of up to 1800 P.S.I. Buyers must provide documentation that they have the ability to safely discharge this product and comply with legal and safe disposal of any products contained in these cylinders. A pressure control and regulator panel for these baskets is also provided. ALL GOODS ARE SOLD AS – IS, WHERE – IS WITH NO WARRANTY. This used CNG fueling station equipment is available for viewing on Wednesday August 7th, 2013 from the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time at the City of Kirkland Fleet Management Office located at 904 8th St., Kirkland WA 98033. Please contact Tim Llewellyn at (425) 587-3881 for additional information. Sealed bids are due on Monday August 12th 2013 no later than 12:00 p.m. Pacific Time. Submit bids to City of Kirkland, Buyer-Finance & Admin. Dept., 123 5th Ave, Kirkland, WA...

Read More »

Types Of CNG Fueling Station

Posted by on Jul 8, 2013 in Uncategorized

Types Of CNG Fueling Station

There are 2 major types of CNG fueling stations: time-fill and fast-fill. Unlike gasoline or diesel stations, compressed natural gas stations are not “one size fits all.”  Building a CNG station for a retail application or a fleet requires calculating the right combination of pressure and storage needed for the types of vehicles being fueled. Making the right choices about the size of compressor and the amount of storage at the station makes a big difference in the cost of fuel and range for vehicles. The main structural differences between the two systems are the amount of storage capacity available and the size of the compressor. These factors determine the amount of fuel dispensed and time it takes for CNG to be delivered. Fast-fill CNG fueling station Fast-fill stations are generally best suited for retail situations where light-duty vehicles, such as vans, pickups, and sedans, arrive randomly and need to fill up quickly. The equipment needed takes up about the size of a parking space. CNG can also be served up in dispensers alongside gasoline or other alternative fuels. Fast-fill stations receive fuel from a local utility line at a low pressure and then use a compressor on site to compress the gas to a high pressure. Once compressed the CNG moves to a series of storage vessels so the fuel is ready to go for a quick fill-up. Drivers filling up at a fast fill station experience similar fill times to gasoline fueling stations—less than 5 minutes for a 20 gallon equivalent tank. CNG at fast-fill stations is often stored in the vessels at a high service pressure (4300 psi), so it can deliver fuel to a vehicle faster than fuel coming directly from the compressor, which delivers fuel at a lower volume. Drivers use a dispenser to transfer CNG gasoline gallon equivalents (GGEs) into the tank. The dispenser displays the pressure and temperature at which the tank is being filled then calculates and shows how many GGEs are delivered into the vehicle. Time-fill CNG Fueling Station (Slow Fill) Time-fill stations are used primarily by fleets. This type of setup works great for vehicles with large tanks that refuel at a central location every night. Time-fill stations can also work for small applications, such as a small station at a driver’s home. At a time-fill station, a fuel line from a utility delivers fuel at a low pressure to a compressor on site. Unlike fast-fill stations, time-fill stations may have larger compressors and the vehicles are generally filled directly from the compressor, not from fuel stored in tanks. Although there is a small buffer storage tank, its purpose is not to fill vehicles, but to keep the compressor from turning off and on unnecessarily and wasting electricity. The time it takes to fuel a vehicle depends on the number of vehicles, compressor size, and the amount of buffer...

Read More »